“The 57-year-old bungalow that sat upon that land was simply a minor nuisance to the developer who replaced it with a huge and rather ugly Vancouver special which is currently for sale at an insanely higher price.”

“I sold my “land” for a stupidly high price in 2010. The 57-year-old bungalow that sat upon that land was simply a minor nuisance to the developer who replaced it with a huge and rather ugly Vancouver special which is currently for sale at an insanely higher price. That’s just how things are done around here.”
Mister Obvious at greater fool.ca 30 Nov 2012 1:44pm

4 responses to ““The 57-year-old bungalow that sat upon that land was simply a minor nuisance to the developer who replaced it with a huge and rather ugly Vancouver special which is currently for sale at an insanely higher price.”

  1. Speaking of ‘minor nuisances’… and Squatting…. Here’s your MondayMorningZen, DearReaders… fresh from the CityO’Angels… a cautionary tale. Naturally.

    “This whole thing just brings back huge regrets,” Cote said. “I look back at all these things, and I’m just full of regret.” – Jeffrey, one of many who bought into the hope of an ever-rising housing market and the promise of a revitalized downtown in the mid-2000s, only to see that investment — and the dream — disappear. Lofts that once sold for $800,000 to $1 million are now worth less than half the amount….

    [LA Times] – Owner leaves his loft empty — then sees a man living inside

    …”Jeffrey Cote was driving home from work one evening this spring when he noticed a light on inside Unit 312 of the Little Tokyo Lofts.

    This was the industrial loft he had bought in downtown Los Angeles for $647,000 — with no money down — at the top of the market in 2007. He thought it would be a great investment. It was also the loft he had abandoned less than two years later, after filing for bankruptcy and expecting the bank to foreclose.

    The loft was still in Cote’s name, so the light surprised him. A few weeks later, he and his girlfriend decided to investigate. They got off the elevator and saw a new welcome mat outside Unit 312. When his key didn’t work, Cote knocked on the door.

    John Glover, a well-dressed marketing consultant, answered.”…

    http://tinyurl.com/bpwogf2

    [NoteToEd: It’s seldom a good idea to invest in neighbourhoods popularized by Snake Plissken’s cinematic exploits. Venice or Malibu would have been a more judicious investment.]

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