“Here’s a message from me to the current owners of the foreclosed house I will eventually be buying: Please put in gas appliances! I hate electric stoves!”

“Here’s a message from me to the current owners of the foreclosed house I will eventually be buying:
Please put in gas appliances! I hate electric stoves. Also would like a few fireplaces, a hot tub in the back yard and maybe a new fence surrounding the property. If you have money to spare (before going bankrupt), please be sure to include new windows, light fixtures and maybe even a new deck (wood please).
Thank you.”

ScubaSteve at VCI 11 Sep 2012 3:48am

In a similar vein, our friend ‘westsidefrank’ on occasion quips with his wife and friends: “Our kitchen is being reno’ed right now…” (even though he believes he’s still years away from buying a home). – vreaa

21 responses to ““Here’s a message from me to the current owners of the foreclosed house I will eventually be buying: Please put in gas appliances! I hate electric stoves!”

  1. Laughing at the misfortune of others? Not cool.

    • Thank you Kath. The leading causes of bankruptcy in Canada are job loss, divorce/seperation and medical problems (#1 reason in the USA). Which are you wishing on your neighbours ScubaSteve?

      • Job loss etc are misfortunes. Leaving zero buffer for such events in personal finances isn’t.

        It’s like crashing your car while going too fast. Don’t take the risk if you’re not prepared for the consequences.

    • oh c’mon Kath, it’s effing hilarious. How can’t you see the hilarity!?!?! Not. Cool.

    • To the salmon I will be eating for dinner: please be sure to eat the finest minnows and sea squirts. Hungry bear is hungry. It has nothing to do with wishing misfortune; it has everything to do with eating salmon.

      • Hungry hear needs to eat to live.
        Greedy a**holes who are waiting to pounce on the misfortune or misdeeds of others don’t need to buy houses to survive…

    • Well said Kath and Allen. The salacious lip licking in anticipation of taking advantage of other’s misfortune (regardless of whether they supposedly deserve it or not) that’s seen on this board sometimes is just plain nasty. Nice character traits there people.

  2. I was in Vancouver last year and we went hiking near Deep Cove (lovely area). During our hike, we met two 16 yr old kids from Van who were hiking on the same trail. We hiked together for over an hour, just chatting. We ended up giving them a ride all the way back to Van because they didn’t have a car, or a drivers licence, they were going to take 2 our 3 buses to get back. Anyway, in the car the most talkative and assured of the two told us : “There’s a lot of money to be made in Vancouver. Just buy a house, rent it out, and in a few years you can buy another one, or maybe a condo. It’s a great investment. You should definitely look into it.” The kid was great but I couldn’t help seeing this as a perfect “shoeshine boy” moment. When a high school kid is giving you unprompted investing advice, just do the exact opposite and you’ll do just fine.

    • This is pretty much how most under-25 born and raised in Vancouverites seem to think. Conceptually, they can’t ever imagine leaving Vancouver (best place on earth syndrome) but they also recognize it’s far too expensive a city to live in, especially if you’re starting out in life (even with rich boomer parents to subsidize a real estate purchase.) They have to buy in to the real estate bull mindset otherwise a very depressing prospect that the best place to be is anywhere but Vancouver.

  3. A place I was in years before, we moved in and asked previous owner to repair some uncovered deficiencies. Big mistake: we had little control over the quality of the repairs as they could care less whether the repair lasted for 5 or 50 years. In retrospect we should have required as-is and discounts for the full cost of repair, though I doubt that would have been acceptable to them.

  4. Take out the radioactive granite countertops too, please!
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/24/garden/24granite.html?pagewanted=all

  5. You overlook what really happens to those houses. At least in the U.S. You’ll be lucky if it still has any copper in the walls.

    • I’ve heard that the looting is so wide spread at the foreclosed houses that banks stopped pursuing evicting former owners from them in order to keep them somehow in order until they are ready to put them on the market (as I understand there is a limit to a number of the foreclosed properties that the bank can put on the market in one period so there is a back log of them in some areas).

      • The talk was that banks were managing their liabilities by not foreclosing en-mass, as that would require marking down the loan. I’ve seen cases of people living in homes for quite some time (years) while waiting for banks to process and foreclose. Some in quite nice neighborhoods. Stressful for them, I’m sure, but also points out that the system isn’t equipped for massive downward restructuring. Various impacts result.

      • A few plausible reasons why banks have been slow to foreclose in the US:
        1) Liquidation in bulk would result in either significantly depressed prices or long sales cycles
        2) There are limited available resources on staff to process the foreclosures quickly
        3) Accounting

      • Ralph Cramdown

        Banks just aren’t good at foreclosures. I’ve seen enough US realtors ranting about their bank clients to say that definitively. If your agent’s professional opinion is that you need to replace the soiled carpet and broken toilets for a super ROI and you don’t do it, you’re being penny wise and pound foolish. Then delay when you do get an offer, let the pool fall into disrepair and don’t mow the lawn…

        Think about it. Is loss mitigation a glamorous department in the bank, one likely to lead to the executive suite? Nope. So what kind of detritus ends up working there?

  6. Esmerelda Fitzmonster

    I for one will revel in reading of sufferings and the misery of these paper millionaires as their financial empires crumble. I am a self made and independently wealthy and dont give a rats ass what any schlub schmoe or jag off thinks about me. But on the way up I have had too many friends tell me f the pain they felt as they were snubbed, sneered and most painfully pitied by the homeowner set for the capital Vancouver crime of renting. The middle class snobbery of “let them eat cake”… welcome to lesson 33 in life you smug jerks facing calamity. Karma is a bitch.

  7. I love reading anecdotes about paper millionaires in distress. Gives me a nice warm cozy Schadenfreude. Goes very well with this 18yr Glenfiddich that I’m enjoying at home, where my heart is, being that a nice rental apartment in the south of the city (not yvr). Cheers everybody!

  8. This message from “ScubaSteve” is actually quite silly if not outright idiotic, and not in very good taste. Why the headline, VREAA???

  9. Pingback: 16-Year-Old High School Kid Offers RE Advice – “There’s a lot of money to be made in Vancouver. Just buy a house, rent it out, and in a few years you can buy another one, or maybe a condo. It’s a great investment. You should definitely look in

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