City Of Vancouver – Enough New Homes; Business-Unfriendly; ‘Green’?

City of Vancouver, 1998 to 2010:
Net increase of new residents: 83,267
Net increase of homes: 50,973
Net increase of new businesses: 46 (0.09%)
Business:Residential tax rate ratio: 4.5:1 (cf 3:1, or less, rest of Canada)
Net increase in cars: 64,329

- from article ‘Business growth in Vancouver stalls while suburbs flourish’, by Don Cayo, Vancouver Sun, 24 Oct 2011

Are these figures correct?
If so:
1. 1.7 new people to each new home (cf 2.1 average household).
2. Unattractive to business endeavours.
3. ‘Green’?
[eyeroll]
- vreaa

7 responses to “City Of Vancouver – Enough New Homes; Business-Unfriendly; ‘Green’?

  1. 1.7 new people to each new home (cf 2.1 average household)

    Entirely possible if many of the new homes are small condos.

  2. Lots of single ladies around here! There are only so many available rich handsome Prince Charming, even if you include the married but available ones.

  3. http://www.metrovancouver.org/planning/development/housingdiversity/HousingDataBookDocuments/Metro_Vancouver_Housing_Data_Book_2011.pdf
    1996 to 2006: change in total housing inventory: 34675 [Housing Inventory by Structure Type in Metro Vancouver Municipalities, 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006]

    http://vancouver.ca/commsvcs/planning/census/2006/pop1891-2006.pdf
    1996 to 2006: change in population: 64033

    1.84 net population change per net dwelling change

    City of Vancouver
    1996: 514008/218540 = 2.35 people/dwelling structure
    2006: 578041/253215 = 2.28 people/dwelling structure

    I think the years chosen by Cayo are rather selective. Why 1998?

  4. The other day I was talking to a colleague in Vancouver on the phone and (can’t remember the context) mentioned the fact that a lot of people where I’m currently living get around on ATVs during the summer.

    She said something snarky to the effect of “well, they’re certainly not environmentalist types then…”

    I gently informed her that people “out here” are generally very, very tied to the land. Much of the time their livelihoods depend upon it. Many of them hunt and fish for food. Logging. Farming. They know the land and, for the most part, respect it.

    I held back from asking her which was worse – scooting to the convenience store on your ATV (a five-minute trip), or idling in traffic five days a week for over an hour each way on your commute.

    Vancouverites like to think that they are “green.” And they love to bash those in smaller towns and rural areas. I’ve heard the bashing. I’ve lived in the Lower Mainland.

    The reality for most Vancouverites, however, is that their carbon footprint is substantially larger than they’d like to think.

    (Although, I’ll bet that many of those “poor” renters who also have to… shudder… take the bus are pretty green…)

    • Ask any Vancouverite on the street what they love to do and somewhere between ‘Weed’ and ‘Food Trucks’, ‘Long Haul Air Travel’ is probably their list of favorite past times.

    • I LOVE those ATVers. They are exactly the kind of people that are needed to keep my oil/gas stocks buoyant.

    • Driving the ATV for 5 minutes to the store will have no environental impact.

      ‘Mudding’, other wise know as using the ATV to tear the shit out of an alpine meadow causing damage that will take years (ir ever) to recover just for the sake of 30 minutes of amusement, is another issue altogether.

      I would like to believe the two groups are mutually exclusive, but unfortunately I am not convinced. That argument is best saved for another blog.

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